What To Do When You're Injured On Your Job

North Oak Professional Park
3034 Mitchellville Road
Bowie, MD  20716

(301) 390-9060 - Phone
(301) 390-9080 - Fax

  • Visit a hospital or doctor as soon after the accident as possible.  You have the right to choose your own treating physician.  After the first visit, don't miss doctor visits, physical therapy treatments, or medical tests.  Missed appointments will help prove to the employer that you aren't really injured whether it's really true or not.  Also, remember to fill your prescriptions if you need them.  Unfilled prescriptions tell the employer that you really don't need the medicine and could possible return to work.


  •  Make an appointment to see your attorney as soon after the accident as possible.   Do not complete or sign any documents or provide any recorded statements to anyone before speaking with your attorney.  This will ensure that you are clear about your rights and your benefits.   There are no upfront or out-of-pocket legal fees for seeing an attorney about your workers' compensation claim.   This applies to most States, including Maryland, DC and VA, but you should check with your individual state laws to be sure.


  •  Work with your attorney to get all official claims documents filed with the "Workers' Compensation Commission (WCC)".   Your employer is not responsible for helping you file your claim or receive benefits.  Forms filled out with your employer may not be the forms you need to send to the WCC.  Keep in mind that your employer is not the WCC.  The WCC is a State agency that oversees matters involving work related injuries.   If you don't get the right documents to the right agency, you may lose all rights to any benefits you may have had a right to.


  • Be sure and keep in contact with your employer while you are off work.  Be sure and tell your employer and any doctor they send you to your medical status only.  This includes whether you can return to work; what physical disabilities you are having; when and where it hurts; what helps the pain and what does'nt; if you can only perform light duty and/or how long the doctor expects you to be off work, etc.  Do not, however, discuss the details of the accident before you speak to your attorney.


  • Keep a record of all documents received or signed by you, including injury reports!


  • Keep copies of your receipts for medical suplies and prescriptions along with mileage logs noting your travel to and from doctor, hospital and physical therapy visits.  You have a right to be reimbursed for these expenses.  However, do not pay for doctor visits out of pocket.  You will not be reimbursed dollar for dollar for what you pay out-of-pocket.


  • Do not provide your private health insurance information to any healthcare provider.  Be sure and give information regarding your worker's compensation coverage.  This will ensure that your private healthcare provider doesn't write you looking to be repaid from the workers' compensation insurer.


  • Be sure and give your employer copies of disability slips which verify that you are unable to work.  Most insurance carriers will not timely pay benefits without up-to-date medical records and/or disability slips.


  • Call your employer immediately after your doctor states that you can return to work.  Insurance carriers will not continue to pay past the date your doctor says you can return to work.  If you can return to work, go immediately so that you don't lose pay.


  • After you have recovered as much as you can and have been released from regular care from your doctor, be sure and collect the lump sum payment due you for the injury you sustained.  You may be entitled to this money whether you completely recover or not.  Of course, you can never be sure, so consult your attorney before you sign any settlement documents.


Of course, this is not a complete list of everything to do if you get hurt on the job, so if you're hurt on the job, no matter how minor, you need help.  Call me at (301) 390-9060 and arrange for a consultation right away!